Skip to content
If You Don't Win, You Don't Pay

Sexual Harassment and How to Seek Legal Action

The legal implications of sexual harassment

Sexual harassment is a serious issue that can have significant legal consequences for both the perpetrator and the victim. In the United States, sexual harassment is prohibited under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sex. The law provides victims with a range of legal remedies, including compensation for damages and injunctive relief to stop the harassment.
If you have been the victim of sexual harassment in the workplace, it is important to understand your legal rights and the steps you can take to seek legal recourse. The following is a general overview of the legal implications of sexual harassment and the options available for victims.

Types of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment can take many different forms, including unwanted touching, sexual comments or jokes, and requests for sexual favors. There are two types of sexual harassment recognized under the law: quid pro quo harassment and hostile work environment harassment.

Quid pro quo harassment occurs when an employee is subjected to unwelcome sexual advances or requests for sexual favors as a condition of employment or in exchange for job benefits. For example, a supervisor who threatens to fire an employee unless they engage in sexual activity with them is committing quid pro quo harassment.

Hostile work environment harassment occurs when an employee is subjected to unwelcome sexual conduct that is severe or pervasive enough to create a hostile or offensive work environment. This can include offensive jokes or comments, sexual gestures, and unwanted touching.

Legal Recourse for Victims

If you have been the victim of sexual harassment in the workplace, you have several legal options available to you. The first step is to report the harassment to your employer or supervisor. Many companies have policies in place for reporting sexual harassment, and you should follow these procedures to the best of your ability.
If your employer fails to take appropriate action to stop the harassment or if you are retaliated against for reporting the harassment, you may have a legal claim for sexual harassment. You can file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which is responsible for investigating complaints of employment discrimination.

If the EEOC determines that you have been the victim of sexual harassment, it may file a lawsuit on your behalf or issue a right to sue letter that allows you to file a lawsuit on your own. You can also hire a private attorney to represent you in a sexual harassment lawsuit.

Schedule Your Free Consultation Today

Back To Top